Post archive

Banksy v Advertisers

Banksy says:

“People are taking the p*** out of you every day. They butt into your life take a cheap shot at you, and then disappear. They leer at you from tall buildings and make you feel small. They make flippant comments from buses that imply you aren't sexy enough and that all the fun is happening somewhere else. They are on TV making your girlfriend feel inadequate. They have access to the most sophisticated technology the world has ever seen and they bully you with it. They are "The Advertisers" and they are laughing at you.

You, however, are forbidden to touch them. Trademarks, intellectual property rights, and copyright law mean advertisers can say what they like wherever they like with total impunity.

F*** that. Any advert in a public space that gives you no choice whether you see it or not is yours. It's yours to take, re-arrange and re-use. you can do whatever you like with it. Asking for permission is like asking to keep a rock someone just threw at your head.

You owe the companies nothing. Less than nothing, you especially don't owe them any courtesy. They owe you. They have re-arranged the world to put themselves in front of you. They never asked for your permission, don't even start asking for theirs.”

Brian says:

“Banksy is taking the p*** out of you every day. He butts into your life takes a cheap shot at society, and stays anonymous. He leers at you from tall buildings and makes you feel oppressed. He makes flippant comments from telephone boxes, bridges and buildings that implies your society isn't sexy enough and that there's no fun happening anywhere. He is in art galleries, books and on the internet making us feel we live in an inadequate society. He has access to the most sophisticated art network the world has ever seen and he bullies you with it. He is "A Graffitti Artist" and he is laughing at you.

You, however, are forbidden to touch him. Trademarks, intellectual property rights, and copyright law mean artists can say what they like wherever they like with total impunity.

Forget that. Any art in a public space that gives you no choice whether you see it or not is yours. It's yours to take, re-arrange, re-use or erase. you can do whatever you like with it. Asking for permission is like asking to keep a rock someone just threw at your head.

You owe the graffitti artists nothing. Less than nothing, you especially don't owe them any courtesy. They owe you. They have re-arranged the world to put themselves in front of you. They never asked for your permission, don't even start asking for theirs.”


Brian Storey, Creative Partner, Wand










The secret to viral success







Spend time surfing the web and you’d think the key to viral success is to feature a cat. Now unless you’re a pet food manufacturer, that’s not a very useful insight.

But if we consider the subject of ‘cats’ for a moment, we could unlock a few viral secrets.

The reason cat videos are so watchable and forwardable (crucial for a viral) is that they’re funny. So if we want to create a successful viral, tip number one is: use humour.

A great example is the recent Old Spice campaign featuring a man, a horse and a superbly witty script. Those online films single-handedly revived the brand.

So what else can our feline friends teach us about viral success? Well, cats love mischief and doing stuff you don’t expect. This neatly brings us to tip number two: be original.

A brilliant example is the ‘Mattress Dominoes viral for Bensons for Beds. It clocked up over a million hits and was reported by all the mainstream news channels. All of which made a very positive impact on the retailer’s bed sales.

Any other viral tips from Tiddles? Well, a cat always makes friends with the head of the house: they target the key influencers. If we want our film to go viral fast, we should do the same.

In fact, one of the reasons ‘Mattress Dominoes’ became viral so quickly was that Ashton Kutcher shared it with millions of his followers on Twitter.

So there you have it. If you want to be in with a chance (because there are no guarantees) of creating something viral, be funny, original and target online influencers. Or just use a cat.

Xanthos Christodoulou, Creative Partner, Wand








A few hints and tips on virals

Enjoy the film....





Brian Storey, Creative Partner, Wand.








Developing a strong creative proposition

Over the past fifteen years, I’ve watched countless client service people, agency planners and creative directors go through near on nervous breakdowns when developing creative briefs.

I’ve witnessed screaming, tantrums and even physical threats all because of one small box found in every single brief titled ‘proposition’.

So, why the big fuss?

Well, it’s because the creative proposition is a big deal. In fact, it’s probably the most important element within a brief. Get it right and the creative people will have a strong foundation to develop compelling ideas to promote your business.

But if the proposition is weak, then even the best art directors and copywriters will struggle to produce an advertising idea that will motivate prospects to buy from you.

So, what is a proposition?

In essence, it’s the single most persuasive thing a brand or product can say about itself; it’s the elevator pitch in one short sentence.

And it’s this that a creative team will use to develop your campaign. It would be reasonable to say that strong propositions generally lead to strong advertising ideas.

With all that in mind, it’s worth considering what makes a proposition powerful:

 1   To begin with, it ought to be focussed. Throw one ball at someone and they’ll catch it. Throw loads and they’ll probably miss them all. Propositions work much the same way. Keep yours single-minded and your audience is more likely to grasp it.

 2.   A proposition also needs to be motivating. This is why it should include a customer benefit; a reason why your prospect should even think about engaging with your brand and, hopefully, buying from you rather than a competitor. They want to know ‘what’s in it for me?’

 3.   Finally, it should be distinctive. A customer benefit is important but there’s no point offering exactly the same as everyone else. If your proposition isn’t distinctive, then your advertising probably won’t be, either.

Of course, there have been plenty of successful campaigns that would contradict everything just mentioned. So it’s worth emphasising that all of the above is a guide not a rule.

And that is precisely why propositions spark so many heated debates...

Xanthos Christodoulou, Creative Partner, Wand








Is your web copy optimised for search or sales?

You can’t bore people into buying a product. That may sound obvious but there’s plenty of dull web copy out there so what’s going on?

Why would anyone invest hundreds of hours and thousands of pounds building a website and then go and undermine it all with a few carelessly chosen words?

The problem is the words aren’t carelessly chosen at all.

They’re often picked with a great deal of thought, care and attention. That’s because, more often than not, the web copy has been written with search engine optimisation (SEO) in mind.

It goes without saying that SEO is crucial. Making sure you’re using the right mix of key words is vital when it comes to ensuring your business tops a search engine’s rankings. You know that if you get it right, customers will walk through your online door.

However, those same key words won’t persuade your customers to part with their money. To do that, you need to ensure your copy is relevant, benefit-led and engaging.

Well, here’s one approach that you may want to consider:

Rather than let key words dictate the flow, content and structure of your web copy, develop the copy as if SEO wasn’t on the radar at all.

Then, once you have copy that sings and sparkles; that really promotes your brand and brings all your product benefits to life, carefully integrate your key words ensuring the flow, tone and style are not compromised.

That way, you’re more likely to satisfy a search engine’s requirements and your customers’ desires at the same time - with fully optimised web copy.

Xanthos Christodoulou, Creative Partner, Wand.








Why creativity is so important in advertising.

Your baby’s first steps, the taste of your mother's freshly baked bread, the scent of newly blossomed spring flowers; these are the sort of memories that stay with us forever.

But what about yesterday’s ads? How big an impact have they made on you? Can you still remember any of them today?

Even one?

Generally speaking, most of us become immune to advertising messages and that’s no surprise when you consider that, on average, we’re exposed to around 2,500 ads every day.

They're online, on petrol pumps, in magazines, on TV, in the press, on the radio, we see them during sporting events and they’ve even appeared on the moon; they are quite literally everywhere.

And yet, we rarely recall a single one.

Why?

The simple answer is that we’re more likely to engage with and remember something when it inspires, excites and interests us. And most ads don’t.

Regardless of how timely, how well targeted or how relevant an advertising message is, if it’s delivered in an uninspiring way then, the chances are, it won’t make much of an impact.

This is why creativity is so important in advertising. How we package and deliver our message is as important as the message itself if we want to engage, persuade and create a lasting impression.

What’s more, an advertising idea that delivers that all important cut-through won’t just generate more business, it’ll save you money, too, as you won’t have to rely on a big media budget to get your message across.

So a strong creative idea is a must. But how can you be sure that an advertising idea is going to be a winner?

There are no guarantees, but there is a simple test.

Next time you’re in a creative presentation don’t make a quick decision as gut instincts can often mislead. Instead, sleep on it.

If you can still clearly remember the idea the next day, the chances are so will your customers.

Xanthos Christodoulou, Creative Partner, Wand.








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